2024 Ford Ranger adds creature comforts, and much more price

By | March 19, 2024

2024 Ford Ranger adds comfort and valueFord

  • The 2024 Ford Ranger starts at $34,265, which is a significant increase over the $28,495 base price of the ’23 Ranger.

  • That base price increase comes with a standard SuperCrew cabin, a standard 10.1-inch media screen and an extensive suite of driver assistance features.

  • The 2024 Ford Ranger also introduces the Ranger Raptor to the United States.


Like Joanie loves ChachiFord’s Ranger is a spin-off. Once a pack on full-size F-Series trucks, Ford changed the Ranger badge to the new Courier replacement in the early 1980s.

Ford finally discontinued the Ranger line in the US in the early 2010s, then wisely gave it the name it rightly deserved in 2019. As it enters its fifth generation in the United States, Ford is giving the Ranger a serious update, but isn’t that the case? do not deviate from the main message.

The most obvious change for the ’24 model year is the streamlined order form. Ford is only offering the Ranger with one box and one bed for ’24. That’s bad news for those who like to know the difference between truck configurations, but it could be an advantage for the people who actually order their rigs. The only available cab is the SuperCrew, a four-door body with seating for five. This cabin is accompanied by a five-foot bed, which now measures 48.2 inches wide between the wheel wells.

While Ford streamlined the body and bed options, the company did expand what’s available under the hood. The base engine is still the 2.3-liter turbocharged I4 mill that sends 270 hp and 310 lb-ft of torque through a 10-speed automatic transmission. Accompanying that I4 is a turbocharged 2.7-liter V6 that sends 315 hp and 400 lb-ft of torque through that same transmission. Of course, the Ranger Raptor adds another powertrain to the mix: a 3.0-liter turbocharged V6.

While the V6 turbos both go to the Ranger, you’ll have to wait for some thoughts on that as we only drove the 2.3-liter.

Despite being a carryover, the entry-level 2.3-liter I4 does a decent job. The throttle mapping is smooth, with a manageable tip in it. You can throw it into sport mode, which provides a more aggressive response. But even in Sport mode, if you tell the Ranger you want all its 270 turbocharged horsepower, you’ll have to wait a while for the turbo to get up to speed and stuff all the air the 2.3-liter engine needs.

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Photo credit: FordPhoto credit: Ford

Photo credit: Ford

Managing that power is still the 10-speed automatic transmission. Operating that transmission is one of two shift levers, depending on the trim: the more budget-friendly XL models get a traditional shift lever, while the more expensive trims get a smaller controller. Fortunately, no Ranger sees a dial. Despite the way it’s driven, the 10-speed transmission does a good job, with quick gear changes on pavement and no noticeable wonder. Full power shifts are noticeable, but not jarring.

Of course, where Ranger customers will spend most of their time in the cabin. While you can still opt for vinyl carpeting and cloth seats, all Ranger models get a digital instrument cluster. This digital display starts with a standard 8-inch screen, but can go up to a larger 12.4-inch screen as you move up. Both digital displays work well, so don’t expect a penalty if you don’t switch to a larger instrument cluster.

Like the digital cluster, there are also a few media screens. The standard touchscreen measures 10.1 inches. The larger screen is scalable up to 12.0 inches. Now both screens feature Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, so you can rest easy if you don’t fancy navigation or extra options. The larger screen controls functions like your seat heaters and is also home to your camera controls. Like the base model’s instrument cluster, both screens work well. Stepping up to the XLT High trim group gets you, among other things, the larger touchscreen of a cheaper Ranger.

The real star of the added features are in the driver assistance systems. The base model of the Rangers comes with automatic emergency braking, automatic high beams and adaptive cruise control. If you upgrade to the XLT models, you get blind-spot detection and lane-keep assist. If you want creature comforts like adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go, you’ll have to step up to Laramie-grade trucks, which also come with rain-sensing wipers, parking sensors and Ford’s Active Park Assist.

As for materials, as we noted, you can still get vinyl floors on the base model XL pickups. That could be a useful piece of information for merchant fleet shoppers, or people who just want to experience some hands-on materials. If you don’t like vinyl, you can opt for carpet on base model trucks for just $145. As you can imagine, the carpet becomes standard equipment as you walk along the grooming path. The materials in the basic model also seem to be designed with sustainability in mind.

There’s plenty of hard plastic to be found, which isn’t really that bad: it’s a truck. However, if you want soft-touch trims on the door panels and touch points, moving up to the XLT and Lariat models will deliver just that. That said, even the nicest Ranger will bow to the bargain in an overloaded F-Series pickup.

Ford Ranger RaptorFord Ranger Raptor

Ford

The suspension of all this is essentially the same basis as with the current Ranger. At the rear, a pair of leaf springs control the vehicle’s weight, payload and axle location. At the front, a short- and long-arm suspension controls the wheels, with steel coil springs and tubular shock absorbers soaking up bumps. According to Ford, rear-wheel drive trucks can carry a maximum payload of 1,806 pounds. If you add a front driveshaft and axle, that number shrinks to 1,711 pounds.

Without anything other than a few people and a few backpacks, this suspension isn’t really going to withstand the abuse it might encounter rolling out of a big box store. However, just managing the task of commuting through cobblestone streets in light traffic, the suspension does an excellent job of controlling bumps and giving the driver and passenger a relatively comfortable cabin. It’s worth noting that it’s on the firmer side, without any extra weight taking up the suspension capacity of the rear end.

Even though the cabin is relatively quiet, there’s a whisper of wind and road noise that might remind some that they’re still driving a truck, not a luxury sedan with a flatbed. Add in the firmer, truck-like ride and you have a truck that still feels like a truck, even with light steering.

The biggest shortcoming? Price. For those who snagged an entry-level ’23 Ranger, you might be seeing some sticker shock. The ’24 Ford Ranger starts at $34,265. That’s a significant increase from the Ranger’s current $28,495 price tag. Of course, that price rises to $37,910 if you want all-wheel drive. Now that price increase comes with a larger cabin and a significant leap in consumer technology. Yet Ford is undercut at the cheapest level by Chevrolet and Toyota. Both are fierce competitors in an exciting race for mid-size trucks.

That said, the added standard consumer technology may entice people to come into a Ford store to check out these trucks. The ’24 Ford Ranger is now on sale and Ford says it is currently shipping trucks to dealers nationwide.

Do you think the ’24 Ford Ranger has what it takes to dethrone the Tacoma? Tell us your thoughts below.

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